Your phone is not a photo storage device: How to find your DCIM and manually move your photos to your computer

Trained photo organizers urge photographers to backup their digital images two or three ways.

Unfortunately, some users don’t backup their images even once. Let’s be clear, if you leave all your digital images on the device with which you take them, they’re not backed up. If the disc in your digital camera corrupts or you drop your phone in the toilet, your images will be gone. And you’ll be sorry.

Cloud storage helps some cell phone photographers. If you use cloud storage. And if you’re backing up your phone properly.

I use an iPhone, and I’m not a fan of iCloud. Honestly, I’m not willing to pay for storage space for most of the photos I take with my phone. Why? Well, let’s just call me frugal. Also, I take a lot of junk images which aren’t worth saving, let alone backing up. But the most important reason is because I manually back up my images so I know I’m saving what’s worth saving, and I know where to find the images later.

I recently changed phones and used iTunes as my backup. For reasons I cannot explain (because some things are unfathomable like that), the images I found on my new phone were not the same ones I had on my old phone. If I hadn’t backed them up manually, I would have been very sorry.

If you want to avoid similar sorrow, here’s a quick step-by-step to finding your images on your phone and backing them up manually:

  1. Plug your phone into your computer. [I have an iPhone and a Toshiba computer with Windows 7 (right, I’m not a fan of Windows 10, either) so the screen shots I share here are what I see. No matter what phone or computer you’re using, you’ll see something similar.]

2. Find your phone on your computer. Sometimes, I have to unplug and replug in the phone to see it. You should see a window like this; you can see “Monica’s iPhone” in the left column and under “Portable Devices.”

phone-camera on desktop

3. Double-click to open your phone. Now you’ll see something like this, “Internal Storage.”

phone-internal storage

4. Double-click to open “Internal Storage.” Now you’ll see the DCIM folder. DCIM stands for Digital Camera Images. If you’ve found it, you’ve found gold. This is the designation for almost any digital camera or phone for photo storage.

phone DCIM

5. Double-click to open the DCIM folder. You might see another level of folders, as I do on my iPhone: 100APPLE. If you have a lot of photos on your phone, you might see 100APPLE, 101APPLE and so on (in Apple’s system, there are 1,000 images in each folder). Open each folder to find your digital images, usually jpgs you can view as thumbnails.

phone Apple100

6. Now you can copy the images you see onto your computer (or another drive). I move them to labeled folders such as “2016 blog photos,” “2016 charitable donations” (I always take pictures of donations to Goodwill for tax purposes) and “2016 family photos” (with sub folders labeled by topic such as “Las Vegas” and “Caswell’s Graduation”).

At this point, you may choose to permanently delete images from the DCIM folder, depending on if you want to access them later from your phone. I usually delete them because I am loathe to show people pictures on my tiny phone screen and I prefer to spend my available phone memory on music files, but that’s me.

Now, in a perfect world you’ll back up your computer files on an external hard drive or the cloud (or, optimally, both which give you two backups to the original images).

Good luck!

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4 comments on “Your phone is not a photo storage device: How to find your DCIM and manually move your photos to your computer

  1. Nicole says:

    This is priceless info!! Thank you so much!!

  2. Granny says:

    “To err is human, to really screw up — you need a computer”. What you are missing here is to suggest to all of your followers that they make an actual print of any shot worth saving. For a few cents it is possible to actually save an important moment. Today I have family images to share that were taken almost 100 years ago. Only because I have an actual print. I love the new technology, but it makes me sad to think that kids today will not have any baby pictures to share in the future.

    • Monica Lee says:

      You make an excellent point and I’m glad you weighed in. I couldn’t agree more about the value of a print, but it’s been a while since I’ve written about it. A print is another backup of a digital image AND prints can be enjoyed without a tiny phone screen or even electricity.

  3. […] computer or thumb drive. If you’re not sure how to save photos to your computer, check how this post on how to find your DCIM and move photos from your phone to your […]

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