New Year’s resolution: How to sort through digital images on your computer

It’s that time of year again when people vow to exercise more, spend less and do something about their photos.

I’ve heard and seen a number of different photo-related resolutions this year. Scrapbookers are committing to using up the supplies they’ve already invested in before buying more. Cell phone users are promising to streamline all the images on their camera roll. Digital image fans are thinking about making some physical prints.

Yup, me too. I’m a photo organizer, and even photo organizers sometimes let their collection of photos get away from them. I committed to sorting through every folder on my computer hard drive to get rid of the junk. A lot of my folders are filled with boring Word docs and PDF files, but there’s that one folder that means the most and needs a little love: My Pictures file. I began my purge-and-backup project there.

I’m one of those unique cell phone camera users who doesn’t use her phone for storage. I move all the pictures I take off my phone to my desktop computer every week or two. I don’t just copy them, I move them over and delete the ones on my phone. First of all, I hate showing people pictures on my tiny screen. The truth is, people will take your phone and look at your pictures politely, but they don’t really get anything out of the exercise other than to acknowledge how much you care about the pictures. And second of all, I hate paying for iCloud storage for a bunch of pictures I don’t particularly care about, and the truth about your phone pictures is that about 90 percent of them are junk.

Protest if you must, but I’m just being honest here. If you’re truly a good photographer, you’re not using your cell phone to take pictures. And even a good photographer needs a good editor.

In any case, as consistent as I am about moving my photos off my phone to my computer, I’m not so good about consistent folder naming practices or sorting through the photos I want to save. If you’re trying to clean up a mess of photos on your computer hard drive this year, too, here are a few tips:

Be methodical

I started at the top level, and I’m looking at every photo in one folder before moving on to the next. I’m committed to doing one folder a day so I don’t get overwhelmed (I’ve already gone through 20 folders in four days, so I’m ahead of the game!). Keep notes so you remember where to begin again when you get back to sorting.

Look at every image

I look at most of the photos in “Extra Large Icons” size, but sometimes I open up a photo to screen size and page through them that way. If you just move folders around, you’re not doing yourself any favors. You need to look at the pictures to determine if they’re worth keeping.

Use a combination of sorting by years (or months) and topic

With digital images, it’s fairly simple to sort photos in chronological order. Just list by “details” and move blocks of photos to folders listed by year or month (if you use months, name them with the year first so they list chronologically, i.e. 2018.01 for January 2018). Think about how you might look for photos later.

photo folders

For example, in my Family Photos folder, I have folders of photos for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. I also have folders for each of my stepchildren, my new granddaughter and my dog (and a couple of others). Where to put photos of my stepson’s graduation, for example? I decided to leave them in the appropriate year’s folder inside another folder named “Caswell’s High School Graduation.” That way, if I forget which folder they’re in, I could do a search for “Caswell” or “graduation” and find them again.

Adopt an attitude to delete

I’ve already saved at least three gigabytes of space on my hard drive by deleting more than 1,000 images in four days. To be sure, I’ve saved probably 3,000 images, but my point is, I got rid of a lot of pictures. This is important for saving memory space, sure, but it also makes it much easier to find pictures later in your smaller inventory of images. Here’s what I dumped:

  • Pictures of food (for some reason, I take a lot of pictures of food; there’s probably a psychological reason for this, but I’ll save that for a therapist). You might be obsessed with something else that no longer holds meaning to you like bouquets of flowers, birthday cakes or interesting cars you see on the street.
  • Blurry images.
  • Pictures of people with their eyes closed (especially me).
  • I encourage people to get rid of at least some of the pictures of sunsets (we tend to take a lot of these), but I gave myself a pass on this.
  • I got rid of at least two folders of photos that were exact duplicates. I never would have noticed this without looking at every image.

Consider a second or third pass

Take advantage of your intuition as you sort. Right away, I could see I had a lot of pictures of food that I no longer needed or cared about. I deleted without inspecting them. You might feel that way about 10-year-old vacation pictures or landscape pictures or pictures of a finished work project. Dump them.

But for some other photos might need more care and attention (we took an epic trip to Croatia three years ago–I’m not ready to delete any of these yet and they probably should be turned into an album at some point). Give yourself permission to go back through those at a later date, when you’re done with the initial sort. At that point, you will have seen your entire collection of photos and you’ll be better informed to prioritize your next steps.

Back up

I use Carbonite to back up the files on my computer automatically. Once I’m finished sorting, I’ll be moving the oldest photos to both an external hard drive and thumb drives.

Be kind to yourself

chloe smaller

The late Chloe

If you lost someone recently, don’t start with those photos. It’s just too hard to delete those images and it might even be difficult just to look at them. My dog died last February, and it’s taken until now for me to be able to look at those pictures without crying. And even now, I could hardly delete any of them, even the blurry ones. But every image I have of my dog is now in one single folder. I’m pondering my next move. I want to print some of the pictures. I may create a storybook for my granddaughter using the images, but I’m also thinking about creating some sort of framed picture or pictures. Whatever I decide, I share it here.

# # #

Do you have more tips? Share them in the comments. Good luck achieving your photo resolutions in 2019!

If it’s the photos on your phone, instead of on your computer, that are making your twitchy, check out this post I wrote two years ago about “Good cell phone photo hygiene.”

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s