Tidying up an ugly pile of negatives

If you’ve Marie Kondo-ed your upstairs storage closet, you might decide your negatives aren’t “sparking joy” and it’s time to dump them.

Not so fast.

It seems like everyone is crazy for Kondo-mania. Marie Kondo is the guru of the book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and now Netflix reality show “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo.” Her process of sorting through your stuff to lighten your load in life is so widespread it has turned into a verb: Kondo-ing.

The last step in her method of decluttering is to tackle sentimental items, which would include photos and, presumably, negatives.

Back when people used film to takes pictures, prints came back from the processor with negatives. When you run across them in your photo collection, they probably won’t spark any joy; they’re difficult to view without a negative viewer, the images are small, and the negatives themselves are hard to handle—thin, awkwardly curved, slippery. You might be tempted to throw them straightaway.

But wait. These negatives are a backup to your printed photos and can be saved in case of damage to the original prints.

The most important thing to do with negatives: Store them separate from your prints. If something tragic were to happen to those prints (think: house fire or water pipe break), the negatives could be used to recreate the print if they are stored somewhere else.

Consider your negatives an insurance policy on your photos; insurance doesn’t usually spark joy either, but it’s nice to have in case of an emergency.

If you’re sorting through a mountain of family photos and come across a bunch of negatives, set them aside. The plastic sleeves in which some negatives come from the processor are likely photo-safe plastic (i.e., polyethylene) so it’s fine to keep them in those sleeves or — if the negatives are loose — the original photo envelope. Negatives don’t have to be sorted and edited as meticulously as a print collection unless or until it becomes necessary, as in the case of one of the aforementioned tragedies.

negs blogStore your negatives in the same way you would store your prints. Use photo-safe materials, and keep them in a cool, dry place (i.e., not the basement or attic) or better yet, the house of a good friend or relative.

If you handle your negatives in this manner, you’ll spark the joy of knowing you’ve mitigated risk without having to invest a lot of time going through every last negative strip and you’ll have tidied up your photo collection. Sweet.

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