The right box for storing printed photos is designed for storing photos

 

As a photo organizer, I’ve seen a lot of containers for keeping loose photos. Frames (frames are designed for displaying one photo, not for storing several). Cardboard boxes (cardboard is useful for Amazon and UPS, not most photographers). Plastic containers of every shape, size and design.

The worst container I’ve ever seen was a laundry hamper. Laundry hampers are designed for dirty clothes, not photos. Even if the material of the hamper was photo safe, which is certainly possible, the size alone was damaging the photos because none of them could lie flat. The photos were a jumbled mess inside — folded, curling, bent and torn.

Not good.

Here’s what happens to photos stored in container meant for other things:

curled photos

Curled photos can be fixed, but it isn’t quick or easy. Better to store them flat in the first place. And a cover can go a long way to prevented fading; eliminate light and you eliminate a lot of discoloration.

There are a lot of boxes in the world for storing printed photographs, and a family historian can get overwhelmed if you don’t know what to look for.

flat photo storage

Even if your photos aren’t labeled as those here, they’d be better off lined up in this box than one that’s not made for photographs.

The first thing to look for in a good photo storage box is one actually designed for photos. You can spend a lot or a little, but if you get a box made for photos, you’ve covered the most important elements. To begin with, a properly sized box will help you keep the photos flat. Also, they’ll be easier to get at when you want to enjoy them or scan them or share them (remember that laundry hamper? Think about how hard it was to get to the photos on the bottom — impossible!).

Second thing to consider: Material. When it comes to boxes for storing your photos, look for acid-free material or photo-safe plastic containers. Avoid recycled materials. Choose opaque when possible, rather than clear, because opaque materials keep out light.

Third: Choose a container with a cover. Covers keep out light, air pollution and dust.

And finally, when it comes to storing your photos, where you put the box matters. Avoid moisture and high temperatures, both of which hasten photo aging. So consider the environment and climate in which they will be stored; find a cool, dry place in your home, such as an upstairs closet.

 

LegacyBox

The Legacy Box

My favorite box is the Legacy Box (inside pictured above), available through most reputable photo organizers (including me). It’s big (stores up to 2,300 photos), beautiful, made with acid-free and lignin-free materials, and designed to keep photos flat and easy to label and see.